With less than a month to go before the start of the 2014 World Cup, thousands of locals have booked travel packages to cheer for Argentina or Uruguay next month in Brazil. Millions more won’t be making the pilgrimage north, but they are planning to take the equivalent of two weeks of paid vacation during office hours.

InfoNegocios does the math for the local workforce: 64 matches x 90 minutes = an investment of 96 hours or twelve 8-hour work days. Beginning June 13, there will be three or four Group Stage matches for fourteen straight days and, unlike South Africa four years ago, most of the matches take place during local office hours.

With less than a month to go to the opening match between Brazil and Croatia on June 12, a Brazilian labor union poll of 600 small and middle-sized businesses found 44% of managers still don’t know how they will deal with accommodating employee requests to watch the World Cup matches.

In Uruguay, 51% of managers surveyed said they have designated in-office viewing rooms, 30% were still undecided, 8% would allow workers to shift around their hours and a Mundial munificent 1% said they would allow employees to work from home.

So what if your boss puts the kibosh on the in-office Copa-palooza? Fear not. For the second-straight World Cup, the City of Buenos Aires will air all 64 matches on giant screens in the Plaza San Martin and the Parque Centenario.

For more information about investing in Argentina or Uruguay, complete the form below.

Quality of life. Affordability. Safety. Transparency. How do Argentina & Uruguay rank globally?
Cattle, crop and timber farm investments in Uruguay plus agribusiness news & analysis.
New construction, luxury living, coastal properties and hospitality trends in Argentina & Uruguay.